MEL Science Raises $6M from the Group of Investors Including Yandex

MEL Science, the first educational platform that utilizes hands-on lab experiments in tandem with VR, is announcing its expansion into classrooms and has raised $6M in funding led by TMT Investment with participation from Yandex, the existing investor Sistema_VC, and several other investors.

Classrooms are historically a laggard with technological adoption, but this is rapidly changing as the K-12 sector in the US spends more than $1.1 billion annually on educational science materials and digital resources. This demand is expected to grow, with STEM jobs growing twice as fast as other jobs, over 10% year over year.

VR environments are a great way to see complex chemistry concepts and learn about them through interaction because you can dive into liquids and solids, build your own atoms and molecules, and much more. MEL Science’s lessons are compatible with almost any mobile phone using the VR headset. MEL Science has partnered with companies producing VR headsets for schools like Redbox VR, VRXOne, and Growlib which will all have the MEL Chemistry app pre-installed.

Vassili Philippov

Founder and CEO of MEL Science

Our chemistry kits and accompanying VR apps gives people a much deeper understanding of science happening behind it. We have already built a great consumer business and now we are applying that unique experience to K-12 education. The MEL Science team includes scientists specialized in chemistry, physics and biology and we have plans to expand into those areas as well.

Our chemistry kits and accompanying VR apps gives people a much deeper understanding of science happening behind it. We have already built a great consumer business and now we are applying that unique experience to K-12 education. The MEL Science team includes scientists specialized in chemistry, physics and biology and we have plans to expand into those areas as well.

“He [Philippov] credits the growing interest in VR for learning and the growing affordability of headsets as part of his company’s growth. According to a report from Common Sense Media, an education nonprofit, headset prices have dropped significantly over the years. Google Cardboard now sells for about $15. On the higher end, HTC Vive sells for about $500. Common Sense predicts the price to drop about 15 percent in the coming years”.

“Companies like MEL may still have parent perception to overcome. The Common Sense report found that while one in five U.S. parents live with a VR-enabled device, 60 percent say they’re somewhat concerned about negative health effects from the technology on their children. About 60 percent of parents also said thy believe VR can enhance children’s education”.

“Educational VR appears to be meeting investors’ high bar as well. Earlier this year, Interplay Learning and Labster saw successful fundraising rounds”.